August 28, 2014
libutron:

Coyamito Agate Pseudomorph | ©Uwe Reier
Rancho Coyamito Norte, Mexico (2013).
Pseudomorphs in agate are quite rare but do occur in nodular agates from various locations, usually as a calcite or aragonite replacement. 

libutron:

Coyamito Agate Pseudomorph©Uwe Reier

Rancho Coyamito Norte, Mexico (2013).

Pseudomorphs in agate are quite rare but do occur in nodular agates from various locations, usually as a calcite or aragonite replacement. 

(via diosaodiosa)

August 27, 2014
I’m an artist with a molecular biology degree from the University of Washington, and I’ve been working on making science infographics for several months now. 
This week I made an animated identification chart of North American butterflies. You can check out the full sized GIF here or pick up a poster for your room here :)
(edit: this was submitted by tabletopwhale!)

I’m an artist with a molecular biology degree from the University of Washington, and I’ve been working on making science infographics for several months now. 

This week I made an animated identification chart of North American butterflies. You can check out the full sized GIF here or pick up a poster for your room here :)

(edit: this was submitted by tabletopwhale!)

August 13, 2014

squidscientistas said: Hi there, I'm a squid scientist at the University of Connecticut and our lab is in a total funding crisis. Last week we started a crowdfunding campaign and we're trying to increase awareness about our effort. If you donate $20 to our research you can name a squid! I hate soliciting like this, I'm a scientist not a marketer, but we're really in a pinch. If you would be willing to reblog one of our posts or post about us yourself, we would be sincerely grateful. Thank you, Sarah McAnulty

If you like scientists and/or squids and you have a couple bucks, throw it to these guys! Check out the post I just reblogged.

August 13, 2014
squidscientistas:

The Nyholm lab needs your support!  We’re launching a crowdfunding campaign to support our research on the Hawaiian Bobtail squid/Vibrio fischeri symbiosis!  If you love cephalopods please share!
https://experiment.com/projects/how-do-bobtail-squid-choose-their-glowing-bacterial-partner

squidscientistas:

The Nyholm lab needs your support!  We’re launching a crowdfunding campaign to support our research on the Hawaiian Bobtail squid/Vibrio fischeri symbiosis!  If you love cephalopods please share!

https://experiment.com/projects/how-do-bobtail-squid-choose-their-glowing-bacterial-partner

August 8, 2014

myampgoesto11:

X-Ray GIFs by Cameron Drake | Behance 

My Amp Goes To 11Twitter | Instagram

(via lemmetellya)

July 10, 2014

nevver:

X-ray specs, Carrie Witherell

July 2, 2014

xysciences:

Ask, and you shall receive. 

(Source: xyprogramming)

July 1, 2014

Anonymous said: hi i have a snake

make this a meme

June 21, 2014
natlparkspictures:

One of Yellowstone’s most beautiful creatures #bison #yellowstone #nationalparks #wyoming by nationalparks_ http://ift.tt/1pWuykY

natlparkspictures:

One of Yellowstone’s most beautiful creatures #bison #yellowstone #nationalparks #wyoming by nationalparks_ http://ift.tt/1pWuykY

10:42pm
  
Filed under: bison 
June 19, 2014

Sign The Petition to Keep the National Zoo’s Invertebrate House Open!

Okay, pause your scrolling, guys, and listen up. I recently found out that the National Zoo in D.C is planning to close the Invertebrates House, where they exhibit honeybees, leaf-cutter ants, and butterflies,cuttlefish, octopi, blue crabs, anemones, orb-weaving spiders, and many other species.  

Invertebrates make up make up roughly 97% of earth’s discovered species, including the disappearing honeybees, dwindling coral reefs, and fantastic tropical butterflies.

 So, science side and bee enthusiasts,let’s get on signing this petition, and signal-boosting the hell out of this! Sign here.

(Source: sweetsweetlisteners)

May 27, 2014
molasses-feet:

Pomegranate Dissection & Cutaway
Cindy Lou Scrivner

molasses-feet:

Pomegranate Dissection & Cutaway

Cindy Lou Scrivner

10:00pm
  
Filed under: botany food biology illustration 
May 26, 2014

thescienceofreality:

#YesAllWomen tweets reveal persistent sexism in science By Fiona MacDonald via ScienceAlert. | Image Credit: First three images via ScienceAlert via Twitter, fourth image via Twitter.

Reading through the tweets on the #yesallwomen hashtag is heartbreaking, illuminating and frustrating all at the same time. 

And if you’re a woman, you’ll be nodding along to nine out of 10 of them.

The hashtag started after it was revealed that 22-year-old Elliot Rodger, lead suspect in the Isla Vista shooting, had shared extremely disturbing and misogynistic views in a video posted shortly before the attack.

Instead of flooding the internet with Rodger-specific fury, Twitter took the discussion to the next level and remind the world that sexism is still very much present across society, and #YesAllWomen experience it.

Among those tweets were many honest and confronting admissions of sexism from female scientists, students and communicators.

This isn’t the first time the issue of misogyny in science has been brought up, but it’s always sad and shocking to see certain opinions persist when females have come such a long way in the field.

As ScienceAlert is staffed almost entirely by women, we though we’d add a few of our own:

Because only 44 out of 835 Nobel Prize laureates are women.

Because senior scientists would still rather hire males, and pay them more.

Because people are still shocked when we tell them ScienceAlert is run by women.

Because that last tweet I screenshotted, via Hannah Hart, really hits home for myself and so many women I’ve talked to over the last few days [much less ever] when it comes to pointing out sexism in general, especially within the STEM world. 

a break from our regular programming for some real important stuff

(via callstheadventurescience)

May 22, 2014
patternbase:

brian-vu: Formations

patternbase:

brian-vu: Formations

(Source: brian-vu, via slimequeer)

May 22, 2014
ifuckingloveminerals:

Rutile
Wannenköpfe, Ochtendung, Polch, Eifel Mts, Rhineland-Palatinate, Germany

ifuckingloveminerals:

Rutile

Wannenköpfe, Ochtendung, Polch, Eifel Mts, Rhineland-Palatinate, Germany

(via acolderindigo)

May 19, 2014
bbsrc:

Inside the world of infection
Fungal pathogens manage to simultaneously pacify their plant victim’s defences whilst seizing host nutrition, creating a very difficult situation for any plant that becomes infected.
Here you can see three different stages of the fungal hyphae of Magnaporthe grisea invading and taking-over a plant cell.
Top panel: After 48h of infection
Middle panel: After 72h of infection
Bottom panel: After 96h of infection
Rice blast disease, which is caused by M.grisea, is one of the greatest pathogen threats to rice crops globally and since rice is an important food source its impact can be devastating.
Scientists from the Institute of Biological, Environmental and Rural Sciences at Aberystwth University, which is strategically funded by BBSRC, are studying the mechanisms behind fungal pathogen infection eventually hoping to reduce this major threat to modern agriculture.
Image from Mr Hassan Zubair from IBERS, Aberystwyth University
For more images of plant infection to go: 
http://tmblr.co/ZtJ7bq1B_-XUW
OR 
http://tmblr.co/ZtJ7bq1BM2QXb

bbsrc:

Inside the world of infection

Fungal pathogens manage to simultaneously pacify their plant victim’s defences whilst seizing host nutrition, creating a very difficult situation for any plant that becomes infected.

Here you can see three different stages of the fungal hyphae of Magnaporthe grisea invading and taking-over a plant cell.

Top panel: After 48h of infection

Middle panel: After 72h of infection

Bottom panel: After 96h of infection

Rice blast disease, which is caused by M.grisea, is one of the greatest pathogen threats to rice crops globally and since rice is an important food source its impact can be devastating.

Scientists from the Institute of Biological, Environmental and Rural Sciences at Aberystwth University, which is strategically funded by BBSRC, are studying the mechanisms behind fungal pathogen infection eventually hoping to reduce this major threat to modern agriculture.

Image from Mr Hassan Zubair from IBERS, Aberystwyth University

For more images of plant infection to go: 

http://tmblr.co/ZtJ7bq1B_-XUW

OR 

http://tmblr.co/ZtJ7bq1BM2QXb

10:00pm
  
Filed under: biology