April 18, 2014

bbsrc:

Food, famine and fungi

Ustilago maydis is a fungus that infects maize crops and causes the disease corn smut. In these images you can see the corn smut fungus (green) infecting a maize leaf (red). This infection will cause large plant ‘tumors’ and can eventually result in plant death.

Diseases like this pose a major threat to modern agriculture and therefore understanding fungal plant pathogens is of huge importance. 

BBSRC-funded scientists from The University of Exeter hope to understand the complex interplay between this fungal pathogen and its plant host. This knowledge will then help in the development of novel fungicides that can stop crop infection and keep food on our forks.

Images and research from Professor Gero Steinberg at the University of Exeter.

For more information on his research go to: http://bit.ly/1sbhNCo

For more plant related blog posts go to: http://tmblr.co/ZtJ7bq16IST19r

Or visit our Facebook at: https://www.facebook.com/bbsrcnews

10:00pm
  
Filed under: biology science cells 
April 17, 2014
The Indian muntjac is also called the “barking deer” due to the barking sound it makes when danger is present. 
(via SOUTHERN RED MUNTJAC | Animals Being Adorable (my guilty pleasure) | …)

The Indian muntjac is also called the “barking deer” due to the barking sound it makes when danger is present.
(via SOUTHERN RED MUNTJAC | Animals Being Adorable (my guilty pleasure) | …)

April 16, 2014
Human bone cancer (osteosarcoma) showing actin filaments (purple), mitochondria (yellow), and DNA (blue) (63x) 
(via Human bone cancer showing actin filaments, mitochondria, and DNA | 2012 Photomicrography Competition | Nikon Small World)

Human bone cancer (osteosarcoma) showing actin filaments (purple), mitochondria (yellow), and DNA (blue) (63x)
(via Human bone cancer showing actin filaments, mitochondria, and DNA | 2012 Photomicrography Competition | Nikon Small World)

April 15, 2014
Catclaw Sensitive Briar 
(by Care_SMC)

Catclaw Sensitive Briar
(by Care_SMC)

April 14, 2014
Cosmarium sp. (desmid) near a Sphagnum sp. leaf (100x) 
Desmids are an order of green algae that are single-celled but divided into two compartments by an isthmus. 
(via Cosmarium sp. desmid near a Sphagnum sp. leaf | 2012 Photomicrography Competition | Nikon Small World)

Cosmarium sp. (desmid) near a Sphagnum sp. leaf (100x)
Desmids are an order of green algae that are single-celled but divided into two compartments by an isthmus.
(via Cosmarium sp. desmid near a Sphagnum sp. leaf | 2012 Photomicrography Competition | Nikon Small World)

10:00pm
  
Filed under: science biology plants algae 
April 13, 2014
Some say that the maned wolf’s long legs are an adaptation to running around in long grass.   
(via Maned Wolf)

Some say that the maned wolf’s long legs are an adaptation to running around in long grass.
(via Maned Wolf)

April 12, 2014
Brittle stars are closely related to starfish. Their arms can be up to 60 cm (24 in) long, and they have specialized nerves on the ends of each arm that can detect light and the presence of certain chemicals.  (via Brittle star | 2012 Photomicrography Competition | Nikon Small World)

Brittle stars are closely related to starfish. Their arms can be up to 60 cm (24 in) long, and they have specialized nerves on the ends of each arm that can detect light and the presence of certain chemicals.
(via Brittle star | 2012 Photomicrography Competition | Nikon Small World)

April 11, 2014
Cacoxenite (mineral) from La Paloma Mine, Spain (18x) (via Cacoxenite-mineral | 2012 Photomicrography Competition | Nikon Small World)

Cacoxenite (mineral) from La Paloma Mine, Spain (18x) (via Cacoxenite-mineral | 2012 Photomicrography Competition | Nikon Small World)

April 10, 2014
Gobi jerboas reproduce 1-2 times a year with 1-3 offspring per litter.

Gobi jerboas reproduce 1-2 times a year with 1-3 offspring per litter.

April 9, 2014
Thin section of a dinosaur bone preserved in clear agate (10x) (via Thin section of a dinosaur bone preserved in clear agate | 2013 Photomicrography Competition | Nikon Small World)

Thin section of a dinosaur bone preserved in clear agate (10x) (via Thin section of a dinosaur bone preserved in clear agate | 2013 Photomicrography Competition | Nikon Small World)

April 9, 2014
The blood-brain barrier in a live zebrafish embryo (20x) (via The blood-brain barrier in a live zebrafish embryo | 2012 Photomicrography Competition | Nikon Small World)

The blood-brain barrier in a live zebrafish embryo (20x) (via The blood-brain barrier in a live zebrafish embryo | 2012 Photomicrography Competition | Nikon Small World)

April 7, 2014

odditiesoflife:

The Most Intense Color of Any Living Thing on Earth

Also known as the marble berry, Pollia condensata is a wild plant that grows in the forests of several African countries. The berries are not edible, but they have an extremely rare property. They produce the most intense color of any living thing on Earth. Even after the berries have been picked from the plant, they stay the same shiny, vibrant, metallic blue color for many decades.

The vast majority of colors in the biological world are produced by pigments—compounds produced by a living organism that selectively absorb certain wavelengths of light, so that they appear to be the color of whichever wavelengths they reflect.

However, the marble berry’s skin has no pigment. The berries produce their vibrant blue color through nanoscale-sized cellulose strands that scatter light as they interact with one another. Thus the fruit’s color is even visible at the cellular level as pictured above.

(Source: blogs.smithsonianmag.com, via linaevelovesyou)

March 5, 2014

bbsrc:

Bright brain cells

The brain cells shown in the images above may play a role in the formation of new memories, and therefore the knowledge gained through studying them could help to diagnose, monitor or treat Alzheimer’s disease.

BBSRC-funded researchers at the University of Leeds have been looking at these brain cells to help them understand the biological events that lead up to people developing Alzheimer’s disease.

Copyright: Danielle John, University of Leeds

For more BBSRC brain cell news visit: 

http://www.bbsrc.ac.uk/news/health/2013/131127-pr-communication-between-brain-cells.aspx

February 13, 2014
biocanvas:

Sticky glands from a Cape sundew
Drosera capensis, or the Cape sundew, is a carnivorous plant covered with sticky tentacles. Insects become trapped in the sap-covered tentacles and activate the plant’s touch response, called thigmotropism. Within thirty minutes, the sundew rolls its leaves towards its center, ensnaring and enveloping its prey in digestive juices.
Image by José R. Almodóvar, University of Puerto Rico, Mayaguez.

biocanvas:

Sticky glands from a Cape sundew

Drosera capensis, or the Cape sundew, is a carnivorous plant covered with sticky tentacles. Insects become trapped in the sap-covered tentacles and activate the plant’s touch response, called thigmotropism. Within thirty minutes, the sundew rolls its leaves towards its center, ensnaring and enveloping its prey in digestive juices.

Image by José R. Almodóvar, University of Puerto Rico, Mayaguez.

(Source: microscopyu.com)

January 20, 2014
tanzellanator:

MRI scan of a human subject from the cranium to the feet.

tanzellanator:

MRI scan of a human subject from the cranium to the feet.

(Source: samstruecalling)