May 22, 2014
ifuckingloveminerals:

Rutile
Wannenköpfe, Ochtendung, Polch, Eifel Mts, Rhineland-Palatinate, Germany

ifuckingloveminerals:

Rutile

Wannenköpfe, Ochtendung, Polch, Eifel Mts, Rhineland-Palatinate, Germany

(via acolderindigo)

May 19, 2014
bbsrc:

Inside the world of infection
Fungal pathogens manage to simultaneously pacify their plant victim’s defences whilst seizing host nutrition, creating a very difficult situation for any plant that becomes infected.
Here you can see three different stages of the fungal hyphae of Magnaporthe grisea invading and taking-over a plant cell.
Top panel: After 48h of infection
Middle panel: After 72h of infection
Bottom panel: After 96h of infection
Rice blast disease, which is caused by M.grisea, is one of the greatest pathogen threats to rice crops globally and since rice is an important food source its impact can be devastating.
Scientists from the Institute of Biological, Environmental and Rural Sciences at Aberystwth University, which is strategically funded by BBSRC, are studying the mechanisms behind fungal pathogen infection eventually hoping to reduce this major threat to modern agriculture.
Image from Mr Hassan Zubair from IBERS, Aberystwyth University
For more images of plant infection to go: 
http://tmblr.co/ZtJ7bq1B_-XUW
OR 
http://tmblr.co/ZtJ7bq1BM2QXb

bbsrc:

Inside the world of infection

Fungal pathogens manage to simultaneously pacify their plant victim’s defences whilst seizing host nutrition, creating a very difficult situation for any plant that becomes infected.

Here you can see three different stages of the fungal hyphae of Magnaporthe grisea invading and taking-over a plant cell.

Top panel: After 48h of infection

Middle panel: After 72h of infection

Bottom panel: After 96h of infection

Rice blast disease, which is caused by M.grisea, is one of the greatest pathogen threats to rice crops globally and since rice is an important food source its impact can be devastating.

Scientists from the Institute of Biological, Environmental and Rural Sciences at Aberystwth University, which is strategically funded by BBSRC, are studying the mechanisms behind fungal pathogen infection eventually hoping to reduce this major threat to modern agriculture.

Image from Mr Hassan Zubair from IBERS, Aberystwyth University

For more images of plant infection to go: 

http://tmblr.co/ZtJ7bq1B_-XUW

OR 

http://tmblr.co/ZtJ7bq1BM2QXb

10:00pm
  
Filed under: biology 
May 18, 2014
This terrarium hasn’t been opened in 40 years! It is completely self-sufficient—the bacteria in the compost breaks down dead leaves to give the plants the carbon dioxide they need, and the moisture in the air condenses on the glass and returns to the soil to feed the plants’ roots.

This terrarium hasn’t been opened in 40 years! It is completely self-sufficient—the bacteria in the compost breaks down dead leaves to give the plants the carbon dioxide they need, and the moisture in the air condenses on the glass and returns to the soil to feed the plants’ roots.

May 13, 2014

logikblok-science:

A New Phytopia - Visualising the structures of life.

That title may have read as a rather grand statement but put simply without plants, life as we know it would not exist. From food, to fibre, to the air we breathe we are quite dependent on plants. The unique photos above are the babies of many different plants AKA seeds. This work has been created by academic/artist Rob Kesseler in partnership with the Kew Gardens Millenium Seed Bank.

Phytopia reveals a hidden world lying beyond the scope of the human eye. Working in the liminal territory between Art and Science. Rob K

There are many ways this work is special. First is the location, these seeds are live specimens forming a genetic bank of sorts within the Kew Millennium Seed Bank it’s quite a similar initiative to the Svalbard seed bank. Here these seeds remain protected, stocked in numbers to potentially restore plant populations if required.

Second is due to the way they are photographed by using a scanning electron microscope. Which basically uses a beam of electrons instead of light, giving the extremely fine details we can see above. These images then have layers of colour, specific to their mother plant, added to them. Rob describes this artistic process akin to how plants attract insects to attracting an audience.

Finally is the individual characteristics the photos highlight. Each seed has been honed through hundreds of years of evolution, adapting each one to succeed in a particular strategy of dispersal and growth. This brings home the fact that these plant babies are alive and individual as you or me.

Plants babies under microscope = eye & brain candy.

Rob K. Kew MSB. Logikblok on FB.

(via beautyofmicroscopy)

May 13, 2014
pitch-pine:

LIFE Nature Library : The Plants © 1963
Geometric Diatom, a microscopic alga, has a silica-coated wall comprised of two overlapping halves, like a box with a lid. Normally golden-brown, it has rainbow hues in this photograph because of the refraction of light.

pitch-pine:

LIFE Nature Library : The Plants © 1963

Geometric Diatom, a microscopic alga, has a silica-coated wall comprised of two overlapping halves, like a box with a lid. Normally golden-brown, it has rainbow hues in this photograph because of the refraction of light.

(via beautyofmicroscopy)

11:07am
  
Filed under: diatom plants 
May 8, 2014
ohscience:

Took this last night. Rat intestines, 40x, Alcian Blue Stain.
(submitted by mcdorkypants)

ohscience:

Took this last night. Rat intestines, 40x, Alcian Blue Stain.

(submitted by mcdorkypants)

May 6, 2014

The dragon blood tree, native to the Socotra archipelago in the Indian Ocean, gets its name from its distinctive red resin, which is used in dye, medicine, and incense. (sources: 1, 2)

May 5, 2014
Long features dubbed tiger stripes are known to be spewing ice from the moon’s icy interior into space, creating a cloud of fine ice particles over the moon’s South Pole and creating Saturn’s mysterious E-ring. (via APOD: 2014 April 6 - Fresh Tiger Stripes on Saturns Enceladus)

Long features dubbed tiger stripes are known to be spewing ice from the moon’s icy interior into space, creating a cloud of fine ice particles over the moon’s South Pole and creating Saturn’s mysterious E-ring. (via APOD: 2014 April 6 - Fresh Tiger Stripes on Saturns Enceladus)

May 4, 2014
Barrett’s esophagus is diagnosed when simple columnar epithelium with goblet cells replaces the normal stratified squamous epithelium lining of the esophagus. Goblet cells are usually found not in the esophagus but in the lower GI tract. This micrograph shows the Barrett’s esophagus cells on the left and the normal squamous epithelium cells on the right. Barrett’s esophagus is highly linked with esophageal cancer.

Barrett’s esophagus is diagnosed when simple columnar epithelium with goblet cells replaces the normal stratified squamous epithelium lining of the esophagus. Goblet cells are usually found not in the esophagus but in the lower GI tract. This micrograph shows the Barrett’s esophagus cells on the left and the normal squamous epithelium cells on the right. Barrett’s esophagus is highly linked with esophageal cancer.

May 3, 2014

bbsrc:

Parasitic bacterium turns plants into zombies

BBSRC-funded scientists have discovered how a bacterial parasite turns plants into the living dead.

The bacteria called phytoplasma is able to manipulate the way plants grow, causing infected plants to transform their flowers into leaf tissue.  In doing so, the plants are sacrificing their reproductive success and becoming sterile – dead to the future and destined to only benefit the survival of the bacteria parasite (healthy plant seen in the top image and an infected plant can be seen in the middle image).

For the first time scientists can reveal how this remarkable manipulation takes place. The parasitic bacterium produces a protein called SAP54 that tricks the plant into transforming its flowers into leaf-like material. This transformation makes the plant more attractive to leafhoppers for settlement - the bacterium’s next victim and host to be (see leafhopper in image three).

Once an enticed leafhopper eats the infected zombie plant, the bacteria then catches a ride in their saliva on to the next plant they hop on to – starting the cycle all over again.

This research comes from the labs of Professor Hogenhout at John Innes Centre, and Professors Angenent and Immink at Wageningen University.

Images: John Innes Centre

Read more at: http://bit.ly/RNWZn5

For more research on plant infection go to: http://tmblr.co/ZtJ7bq1BM2QXb

(submitted by tanzellanator)

(via rorschachx)

10:00pm
  
Filed under: plants botany insects flowers 
May 2, 2014
Chamaeleo calyptratus (veiled chameleon) embryo showing cartilage (blue) and bone (red)

Chamaeleo calyptratus (veiled chameleon) embryo showing cartilage (blue) and bone (red)

May 1, 2014
2014 April 8 - M42: Inside the Orion Nebula

2014 April 8 - M42: Inside the Orion Nebula

April 30, 2014

These black roses grow naturally in the tiny village of Halfeti, Turkey. The particular soil conditions and pH levels of the groundwater from the river Euphrates causes the roses to fade from deep crimson to black during the summer. (source)

April 29, 2014
Hippocampal neuron receiving excitatory contacts

Hippocampal neuron receiving excitatory contacts

April 29, 2014

Anonymous said: Any particular reason for M1 as your icon?

it’s the photo that inspired me to start this blog! i was like WHOA THE UNIVERSE IS P. COOL and the rest is history