August 8, 2014

myampgoesto11:

X-Ray GIFs by Cameron Drake | Behance 

My Amp Goes To 11Twitter | Instagram

(via lemmetellya)

July 10, 2014

nevver:

X-ray specs, Carrie Witherell

July 2, 2014

xysciences:

Ask, and you shall receive. 

(Source: xyprogramming)

July 1, 2014

Anonymous said: hi i have a snake

make this a meme

June 21, 2014
natlparkspictures:

One of Yellowstone’s most beautiful creatures #bison #yellowstone #nationalparks #wyoming by nationalparks_ http://ift.tt/1pWuykY

natlparkspictures:

One of Yellowstone’s most beautiful creatures #bison #yellowstone #nationalparks #wyoming by nationalparks_ http://ift.tt/1pWuykY

10:42pm
  
Filed under: bison 
June 19, 2014

Sign The Petition to Keep the National Zoo’s Invertebrate House Open!

Okay, pause your scrolling, guys, and listen up. I recently found out that the National Zoo in D.C is planning to close the Invertebrates House, where they exhibit honeybees, leaf-cutter ants, and butterflies,cuttlefish, octopi, blue crabs, anemones, orb-weaving spiders, and many other species.  

Invertebrates make up make up roughly 97% of earth’s discovered species, including the disappearing honeybees, dwindling coral reefs, and fantastic tropical butterflies.

 So, science side and bee enthusiasts,let’s get on signing this petition, and signal-boosting the hell out of this! Sign here.

(Source: sweetsweetlisteners)

May 27, 2014
molasses-feet:

Pomegranate Dissection & Cutaway
Cindy Lou Scrivner

molasses-feet:

Pomegranate Dissection & Cutaway

Cindy Lou Scrivner

(via bruhhnny)

10:00pm
  
Filed under: botany food biology illustration 
May 22, 2014
patternbase:

brian-vu: Formations

patternbase:

brian-vu: Formations

(Source: brian-vu, via ectoqueer)

May 22, 2014
ifuckingloveminerals:

Rutile
Wannenköpfe, Ochtendung, Polch, Eifel Mts, Rhineland-Palatinate, Germany

ifuckingloveminerals:

Rutile

Wannenköpfe, Ochtendung, Polch, Eifel Mts, Rhineland-Palatinate, Germany

(via acolderindigo)

May 19, 2014
bbsrc:

Inside the world of infection
Fungal pathogens manage to simultaneously pacify their plant victim’s defences whilst seizing host nutrition, creating a very difficult situation for any plant that becomes infected.
Here you can see three different stages of the fungal hyphae of Magnaporthe grisea invading and taking-over a plant cell.
Top panel: After 48h of infection
Middle panel: After 72h of infection
Bottom panel: After 96h of infection
Rice blast disease, which is caused by M.grisea, is one of the greatest pathogen threats to rice crops globally and since rice is an important food source its impact can be devastating.
Scientists from the Institute of Biological, Environmental and Rural Sciences at Aberystwth University, which is strategically funded by BBSRC, are studying the mechanisms behind fungal pathogen infection eventually hoping to reduce this major threat to modern agriculture.
Image from Mr Hassan Zubair from IBERS, Aberystwyth University
For more images of plant infection to go: 
http://tmblr.co/ZtJ7bq1B_-XUW
OR 
http://tmblr.co/ZtJ7bq1BM2QXb

bbsrc:

Inside the world of infection

Fungal pathogens manage to simultaneously pacify their plant victim’s defences whilst seizing host nutrition, creating a very difficult situation for any plant that becomes infected.

Here you can see three different stages of the fungal hyphae of Magnaporthe grisea invading and taking-over a plant cell.

Top panel: After 48h of infection

Middle panel: After 72h of infection

Bottom panel: After 96h of infection

Rice blast disease, which is caused by M.grisea, is one of the greatest pathogen threats to rice crops globally and since rice is an important food source its impact can be devastating.

Scientists from the Institute of Biological, Environmental and Rural Sciences at Aberystwth University, which is strategically funded by BBSRC, are studying the mechanisms behind fungal pathogen infection eventually hoping to reduce this major threat to modern agriculture.

Image from Mr Hassan Zubair from IBERS, Aberystwyth University

For more images of plant infection to go: 

http://tmblr.co/ZtJ7bq1B_-XUW

OR 

http://tmblr.co/ZtJ7bq1BM2QXb

10:00pm
  
Filed under: biology 
May 18, 2014
This terrarium hasn’t been opened in 40 years! It is completely self-sufficient—the bacteria in the compost breaks down dead leaves to give the plants the carbon dioxide they need, and the moisture in the air condenses on the glass and returns to the soil to feed the plants’ roots.

This terrarium hasn’t been opened in 40 years! It is completely self-sufficient—the bacteria in the compost breaks down dead leaves to give the plants the carbon dioxide they need, and the moisture in the air condenses on the glass and returns to the soil to feed the plants’ roots.

May 13, 2014

logikblok-science:

A New Phytopia - Visualising the structures of life.

That title may have read as a rather grand statement but put simply without plants, life as we know it would not exist. From food, to fibre, to the air we breathe we are quite dependent on plants. The unique photos above are the babies of many different plants AKA seeds. This work has been created by academic/artist Rob Kesseler in partnership with the Kew Gardens Millenium Seed Bank.

Phytopia reveals a hidden world lying beyond the scope of the human eye. Working in the liminal territory between Art and Science. Rob K

There are many ways this work is special. First is the location, these seeds are live specimens forming a genetic bank of sorts within the Kew Millennium Seed Bank it’s quite a similar initiative to the Svalbard seed bank. Here these seeds remain protected, stocked in numbers to potentially restore plant populations if required.

Second is due to the way they are photographed by using a scanning electron microscope. Which basically uses a beam of electrons instead of light, giving the extremely fine details we can see above. These images then have layers of colour, specific to their mother plant, added to them. Rob describes this artistic process akin to how plants attract insects to attracting an audience.

Finally is the individual characteristics the photos highlight. Each seed has been honed through hundreds of years of evolution, adapting each one to succeed in a particular strategy of dispersal and growth. This brings home the fact that these plant babies are alive and individual as you or me.

Plants babies under microscope = eye & brain candy.

Rob K. Kew MSB. Logikblok on FB.

(via beautyofmicroscopy)

May 13, 2014
pitch-pine:

LIFE Nature Library : The Plants © 1963
Geometric Diatom, a microscopic alga, has a silica-coated wall comprised of two overlapping halves, like a box with a lid. Normally golden-brown, it has rainbow hues in this photograph because of the refraction of light.

pitch-pine:

LIFE Nature Library : The Plants © 1963

Geometric Diatom, a microscopic alga, has a silica-coated wall comprised of two overlapping halves, like a box with a lid. Normally golden-brown, it has rainbow hues in this photograph because of the refraction of light.

(via beautyofmicroscopy)

11:07am
  
Filed under: diatom plants 
May 8, 2014
ohscience:

Took this last night. Rat intestines, 40x, Alcian Blue Stain.
(submitted by mcdorkypants)

ohscience:

Took this last night. Rat intestines, 40x, Alcian Blue Stain.

(submitted by mcdorkypants)

May 6, 2014

The dragon blood tree, native to the Socotra archipelago in the Indian Ocean, gets its name from its distinctive red resin, which is used in dye, medicine, and incense. (sources: 1, 2)