May 5, 2014
Long features dubbed tiger stripes are known to be spewing ice from the moon’s icy interior into space, creating a cloud of fine ice particles over the moon’s South Pole and creating Saturn’s mysterious E-ring. (via APOD: 2014 April 6 - Fresh Tiger Stripes on Saturns Enceladus)

Long features dubbed tiger stripes are known to be spewing ice from the moon’s icy interior into space, creating a cloud of fine ice particles over the moon’s South Pole and creating Saturn’s mysterious E-ring. (via APOD: 2014 April 6 - Fresh Tiger Stripes on Saturns Enceladus)

May 4, 2014
Barrett’s esophagus is diagnosed when simple columnar epithelium with goblet cells replaces the normal stratified squamous epithelium lining of the esophagus. Goblet cells are usually found not in the esophagus but in the lower GI tract. This micrograph shows the Barrett’s esophagus cells on the left and the normal squamous epithelium cells on the right. Barrett’s esophagus is highly linked with esophageal cancer.

Barrett’s esophagus is diagnosed when simple columnar epithelium with goblet cells replaces the normal stratified squamous epithelium lining of the esophagus. Goblet cells are usually found not in the esophagus but in the lower GI tract. This micrograph shows the Barrett’s esophagus cells on the left and the normal squamous epithelium cells on the right. Barrett’s esophagus is highly linked with esophageal cancer.

May 3, 2014

bbsrc:

Parasitic bacterium turns plants into zombies

BBSRC-funded scientists have discovered how a bacterial parasite turns plants into the living dead.

The bacteria called phytoplasma is able to manipulate the way plants grow, causing infected plants to transform their flowers into leaf tissue.  In doing so, the plants are sacrificing their reproductive success and becoming sterile – dead to the future and destined to only benefit the survival of the bacteria parasite (healthy plant seen in the top image and an infected plant can be seen in the middle image).

For the first time scientists can reveal how this remarkable manipulation takes place. The parasitic bacterium produces a protein called SAP54 that tricks the plant into transforming its flowers into leaf-like material. This transformation makes the plant more attractive to leafhoppers for settlement - the bacterium’s next victim and host to be (see leafhopper in image three).

Once an enticed leafhopper eats the infected zombie plant, the bacteria then catches a ride in their saliva on to the next plant they hop on to – starting the cycle all over again.

This research comes from the labs of Professor Hogenhout at John Innes Centre, and Professors Angenent and Immink at Wageningen University.

Images: John Innes Centre

Read more at: http://bit.ly/RNWZn5

For more research on plant infection go to: http://tmblr.co/ZtJ7bq1BM2QXb

(submitted by tanzellanator)

(via rorschachx)

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Filed under: plants botany insects flowers 
May 2, 2014
Chamaeleo calyptratus (veiled chameleon) embryo showing cartilage (blue) and bone (red)

Chamaeleo calyptratus (veiled chameleon) embryo showing cartilage (blue) and bone (red)

May 1, 2014
2014 April 8 - M42: Inside the Orion Nebula

2014 April 8 - M42: Inside the Orion Nebula

April 30, 2014

These black roses grow naturally in the tiny village of Halfeti, Turkey. The particular soil conditions and pH levels of the groundwater from the river Euphrates causes the roses to fade from deep crimson to black during the summer. (source)

April 29, 2014
Hippocampal neuron receiving excitatory contacts

Hippocampal neuron receiving excitatory contacts

April 29, 2014

Anonymous said: Any particular reason for M1 as your icon?

it’s the photo that inspired me to start this blog! i was like WHOA THE UNIVERSE IS P. COOL and the rest is history

April 28, 2014
a redwood in Humboldt Redwoods State Park, California

a redwood in Humboldt Redwoods State Park, California

(Source: Wikipedia)

April 27, 2014
Cross section of Liana stem (climbing tropical plant) (40x) (via Cross section of Liana stem (climbing tropical plant) | Brightfield | Nikon Small World)

Cross section of Liana stem (climbing tropical plant) (40x) (via Cross section of Liana stem (climbing tropical plant) | Brightfield | Nikon Small World)

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Filed under: science biology plants cells liana 
April 26, 2014
Daisy—unwrapped petals (5x) (via Daisy-unwrapped petals | Brightfield | Nikon Small World)

Daisy—unwrapped petals (5x) (via Daisy-unwrapped petals | Brightfield | Nikon Small World)

April 25, 2014
Cross section of superconducting magnet wire etched with nitric acid (150x) (via Cross section of superconducting magnet wire etched with nitric acid | Brightfield | Nikon Small World)

Cross section of superconducting magnet wire etched with nitric acid (150x) (via Cross section of superconducting magnet wire etched with nitric acid | Brightfield | Nikon Small World)

April 24, 2014
A liana is a woody climber that starts at ground level, and uses trees to climb up to the canopy where it spreads from tree to tree to get as much light as possible. Lianas are especially characteristic of tropical moist deciduous forests and rainforests. These climbers often form bridges between the forest canopy, connect the entire forest and provide arboreal animals with paths across the forest. This is a Monkey Ladder vine.

A liana is a woody climber that starts at ground level, and uses trees to climb up to the canopy where it spreads from tree to tree to get as much light as possible. Lianas are especially characteristic of tropical moist deciduous forests and rainforests. These climbers often form bridges between the forest canopy, connect the entire forest and provide arboreal animals with paths across the forest. This is a Monkey Ladder vine.

April 23, 2014
Detached retina of red-eared turtle (sp. Pseudemys scripta elegans), showing oil droplets located in the outermost inner segments of cone photoreceptors (400x) (via Detached retina of red-eared turtle (sp. Pseudemys scripta elegans), showing oil droplets located in | Brightfield | Nikon Small World)

Detached retina of red-eared turtle (sp. Pseudemys scripta elegans), showing oil droplets located in the outermost inner segments of cone photoreceptors (400x) (via Detached retina of red-eared turtle (sp. Pseudemys scripta elegans), showing oil droplets located in | Brightfield | Nikon Small World)

April 23, 2014

happy third birthday to my second-favorite side blog, anatomicallyincorrect! dedicated to science-themed art, it can get a tad gruesome once in a while, so follow with caution.