June 24, 2013
"[Killifish] can live quite happily in any muddy pool, creek, or ditch, any salty marsh, polluted harbor or brackish estuary you throw at them; they are unfazed by a severe lack of oxygen, high levels of carbon dioxide, or foul substances in their water, and even if their habitat dries up completely, they can survive in the surrounding mud."
(HuffPo)

"[Killifish] can live quite happily in any muddy pool, creek, or ditch, any salty marsh, polluted harbor or brackish estuary you throw at them; they are unfazed by a severe lack of oxygen, high levels of carbon dioxide, or foul substances in their water, and even if their habitat dries up completely, they can survive in the surrounding mud."

(HuffPo)

June 20, 2013
This slender, translucent, and scaleless fish really takes advantage of being pencil thin. Not content to make its own home in the seabed or the crevices of rocks, almost all species of the pearlfish family live in the body cavities of invertebrates such as clams, oysters, and starfish.
“Pearlfish” is the common name of the Carapidae family, which includes thirty-one species of fish that live in the tropical waters of every ocean on Earth except the Arctic. The family earned its common name after a dead pearlfish was discovered inside an oyster shell; it had been encrusted and paralyzed by the substance produced by an oyster to create its shell’s second inner layer—the mother-of-pearl lining.
(HuffPo)

This slender, translucent, and scaleless fish really takes advantage of being pencil thin. Not content to make its own home in the seabed or the crevices of rocks, almost all species of the pearlfish family live in the body cavities of invertebrates such as clams, oysters, and starfish.

“Pearlfish” is the common name of the Carapidae family, which includes thirty-one species of fish that live in the tropical waters of every ocean on Earth except the Arctic. The family earned its common name after a dead pearlfish was discovered inside an oyster shell; it had been encrusted and paralyzed by the substance produced by an oyster to create its shell’s second inner layer—the mother-of-pearl lining.

(HuffPo)

February 24, 2012
Danio rerio (zebrafish) gill branches (46.7x) (2000 - James E. Hayden, RBP, FBCA)

Danio rerio (zebrafish) gill branches (46.7x) (2000 - James E. Hayden, RBP, FBCA)

8:00am
  
Filed under: science biology fish zebrafish gills 
February 23, 2012
3 day post-fertilization zebrafish embryo (20X) (2011 - John Gaynes)

3 day post-fertilization zebrafish embryo (20X) (2011 - John Gaynes)

December 19, 2011
http://i.imgur.com/Et5lR.jpg
This is the source, not my original picture. But this is a Barreleye fish (Macropinna microstoma). His head is transparent and the eyes are inside the transparent part so he can look straight up.
submission from nuclear-noelle

http://i.imgur.com/Et5lR.jpg

This is the source, not my original picture. But this is a Barreleye fish (Macropinna microstoma). His head is transparent and the eyes are inside the transparent part so he can look straight up.

submission from nuclear-noelle

November 23, 2011
Another of my photos.
(submission from thephantomdragon)

Another of my photos.

(submission from thephantomdragon)

October 21, 2011
Knee-deep wading is bliss for camels in Chad’s Archeï oasis, a canyon whose trapped waters hold a zoological surprise. Fertilized by beasts’ droppings, algae are eaten by fish that are preyed upon by an isolated group of crocodiles. 

Knee-deep wading is bliss for camels in Chad’s Archeï oasis, a canyon whose trapped waters hold a zoological surprise. Fertilized by beasts’ droppings, algae are eaten by fish that are preyed upon by an isolated group of crocodiles. 

October 20, 2011
A school of juvenile marine catfish masses over the sandy bottom of Suruga Bay off Japan’s Izu Peninsula.

A school of juvenile marine catfish masses over the sandy bottom of Suruga Bay off Japan’s Izu Peninsula.

October 11, 2011
rainbow parrotfish

rainbow parrotfish

October 1, 2011
from national geographic:
Smaller fish keep their distance when a blacktip reef shark swims amongst them in shallow water in the Maldives.

from national geographic:

Smaller fish keep their distance when a blacktip reef shark swims amongst them in shallow water in the Maldives.

September 27, 2011
transparent animals preserved and dyed

transparent animals preserved and dyed

September 27, 2011
from wikipedia: 
Marine fish can produce high numbers of eggs which are often released into the open water column, the eggs have an average diameter of 1mm. This fish egg was collected in Tasmanian Waters.

from wikipedia: 

Marine fish can produce high numbers of eggs which are often released into the open water column, the eggs have an average diameter of 1mm. This fish egg was collected in Tasmanian Waters.

4:00am
  
Filed under: fish eggs science biology fish animals 
September 26, 2011
from national geographic:
The clownish grin of a bridled parrotfish reveals its power tools: grinding teeth used to scrape algae from rock. Though sometimes destructive to individual corals, the fish’s efforts are mostly beneficial. Without them, algal growth could smother the reef. 

from national geographic:

The clownish grin of a bridled parrotfish reveals its power tools: grinding teeth used to scrape algae from rock. Though sometimes destructive to individual corals, the fish’s efforts are mostly beneficial. Without them, algal growth could smother the reef. 

September 19, 2011
Trout alevin (larva) (10X)

Trout alevin (larva) (10X)

September 8, 2011
All clownfish are born male. When they become adults, the largest, most dominant fish becomes a female, and the second largest becomes the breeding male. If the breeding female disappears, the breeding male (now the largest of the group) will become a female, and so on. In other species of tropical fish, when the ratio between males and females becomes imbalanced, dominant females may become males. 

All clownfish are born male. When they become adults, the largest, most dominant fish becomes a female, and the second largest becomes the breeding male. If the breeding female disappears, the breeding male (now the largest of the group) will become a female, and so on. In other species of tropical fish, when the ratio between males and females becomes imbalanced, dominant females may become males.